MarkR Fleckner MD
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How Garden City Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark R. Fleckner MD Can Save Your Sight Before Problems Start

People who are worried about their vision fading with age or illness have a new hope: Garden City Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark R. Fleckner MD

 

Dr. Mark R. Fleckner is an expert at helping people find early warning signs of eye problems that could eventually cause loss of vision. According to Dr. Mark R. Fleckner of Garden City, early detection and treatment of eye problems is key. If eye problems go on for too long, irreversible damage can be caused.

Dr. Mark Fleckner Believes Early Detection Is Key

When it comes to seeing the eye doctor, regularly scheduled appointments are key. Dr. Mark R. Fleckner of Garden City recommends getting eyes checked by an ophthalmologist at least once a year – or more frequently if you have eye issues that cause concern.

If you see floaters, experience bouts of lost vision, have pain in your eyes, have blurry vision that lasts for more than a few seconds upon waking, or if you have double vision, Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark R. Fleckner MD recommends seeing an eye care professional right away. Left untreated, these issues can cause permanent eye damage, including blindness.

garden city ophthalmologist

 

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a scary thought for many, but Dr. Mark R. Fleckner MD knows that early detection is key.

The sooner glaucoma is detected, the sooner treatments can begin that can protect eye health over time. Early detection of glaucoma is especially important for diabetics, as they are more likely to have long-term health problems due to the disease.

Cataracts

Garden City Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark R. Fleckner MD says that cataracts are easily treatable. The sooner a cataract is found, the sooner it can be removed, preserving vision for years to come.
Dr. Mark Fleckner recommends seeing an eye care professional if you experience any of the common signs of cataracts, including cloudy vision, trouble seeing at night, a yellowing of colors in your vision, or seeing a halo around bright lights. Dr. Mark Fleckner says that an eye care professional can help you understand whether it’s time to surgically remove your cataracts.

Early Detection Matters

Dr. Mark R. Fleckner MD understands that many people are afraid to reach out to an eye care professional when their vision begins to fail. Being afraid of what you might hear is normal, but early detection is vital when it comes to treating conditions that could threaten vision.

A fear of the unknown is normal, but being afraid to see the eye doctor can lead to blindness. Dr. Mark R. Fleckner of Garden City recommends talking to your eye doctor if you’re nervous about your symptoms so that they can be properly diagnosed and addressed.

Garden City Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark R. Fleckner MD Explains What You Need to Know About Retinal Detachment

Retinal tears and detachment are a serious eye condition that can result in vision loss. Dr. Mark R. Fleckner MD is a New York-based and board-certified ophthalmologist specializing in vitreoretinal diseases and surgery. While much of his work involves treatment he also takes the time to educate his patients about prevention and let them know what symptoms to watch out for that could indicate trouble. Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark R. Fleckner MD explains what you should know about retinal detachments.

The retina is a thin layer of nerve tissue that lines the eye; it converts light into images which it sends to the brain. Changes in the vitreous, a jelly-like fluid, can pull the retina and cause a tear or hole. As fluid leaks behind the retina, it can build up and cause pressure, resulting in the retina separating from the back wall of the eye. This is known as detachment.

Symptoms of retinal detachment include flashes of light, floaters, gray or black specks that seem to drift into your field of vision. Floaters can be attributed to age, Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark R. Fleckner says, but if you suddenly see many of them, or experience floaters along with other symptoms of retinal damage, you should see your doctor right away. A third symptom is inhibited peripheral vision, which may feel like a “curtain.” Garden City Ophthalmologist Mark R Fleckner MD stresses that a retinal detachment is a medical emergency requiring immediate attention. In some cases, it can cause permanent vision loss.

Anyone can experience retinal detachment, Dr. Mark R. Fleckner of Garden City says, but it is most common in adults ages 40 and older. An injury to the eye or a family history of retinal detachment, cataracts, or extreme nearsightedness can increase your risk.

Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark R. Fleckner says there are three main ways to treat retinal detachment. These include pneumatic retinopexy, vitrectomy, and scleral buckle. Your eye doctor will determine what procedure is best for you depending on the location and severity of the tear.

If you suspect you have a retinal tear or detachment, turn to Garden City Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark R. Fleckner. For over 20 years, he has been one of Long Island’s most trusted ophthalmologists, providing a range of services for issues including retinal detachments, diabetic retinopathy, and macular degeneration.

Click here to visit his website and learn more about his credentials and practice.

Dr. Mark Fleckner

Dr. Mark Fleckner Explains 5 Eye Symptoms You Should Never Ignore

Not only are eyes the windows to the soul, but they can also offer a glimpse of a person’s overall health and wellbeing. Ophthalmologists like Dr. Mark Fleckner say getting regular eye exams is crucial as doctors can prevent and treat issues more effectively with early detection. In between eye exams, you should also take charge of your health by keeping an eye out for unusual changes which could be signs of serious trouble.

Dr. Mark Fleckner cites the American Academy of Ophthalmology which recommends people ages 18 to 60 have an eye exam every two years, at least, while people over age 60 should have them more frequently. People under age 60 with certain risk factors, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or genetic predisposition to eye ailments such as glaucoma, should also have eye exams more frequently.Mark R Fleckner MD

During an eye exam, the doctor will of course check for problems within the eye itself, such as enlarged blood vessels, leaking, or vision changes, which may indicate issues such as glaucoma or retinal tears. However, the doctor may also be able to detect ailments such as irregular thyroid, high blood pressure, or diabetes, Dr. Mark Fleckner says.

Mark R Fleckner MD says to pay close attention and see your eye doctor right away if you experience the following symptoms:

Floaters: Floaters are fairly common and resemble gnats or web-like squiggles. While the occasional floater is normal, if yours don’t go away, this is cause for concern. They may also be accompanied by flashes of light. These symptoms may be a sign of posterior vitreous detachment or something more serious, like a retinal tear, which can be blinding if not treated.

Eye Pain: Eyes should never hurt, so this should always be taken seriously. It may be a sign of undiagnosed glaucoma, optic neuropathy, or inflammation. Or, it may be a symptom of injury from something such as extreme heat (ex., lighting fireworks or working with a blowtorch without safety gear). Don’t try a DIY method to relieve the pain, such as rinsing or drops, as this may exacerbate the condition.

Blurry Vision: Vision change is normal, particularly with age. However, sometimes a change in vision can be a symptom of a problem more serious than age-related vision decline. One of the most common issues, and the leading cause of blindness worldwide, is glaucoma.

Redness: Redness can be a sign of something benign like allergies or lack of sleep. While unhealthy, these factors are not a threat to your permanent vision and wellbeing. However, if you wear contacts and your eyes become red, watery, and painful, it may be a sign of infection. Stop wearing contacts immediately and see your doctor. Untreated, eye infections can cause permanent damage. One way to prevent this is to never, ever sleep in your contacts, Dr. Mark Fleckner says. Get in the habit of taking your contacts out at the end of the day and switching to glasses instead.

Double Vision: Double vision may be caused by having a few drinks, but if you’re experiencing it while sober, it may signal something more sinister. If your double vision is in one eye, it may indicate an issue with the cornea. In both eyes, it may signal a neurological issue. If you have double vision along with slurred speech or pain, it may be a sign of a stroke; go to the hospital immediately, says Dr. Mark Fleckner.

Dr. Mark Fleckner Explains How to Prevent Diabetic Retinopathy

Mark R Fleckner MD

According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 100 million adults in the United States have diabetes or prediabetes. The disease is linked with a host of subsequent health issues, including blindness and diabetic retinopathy, the latter of which affects almost one-third of adults aged 40 and older who have diabetes. Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark Fleckner specializes in vitreoretinal diseases and surgery, including treatment for diabetic retinopathy. A New York board-certified ophthalmologist, Mark R Fleckner MD emphasizes that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. He is here to explain what diabetic retinopathy is and how you can prevent it.

Diabetic retinopathy is a result of persistently high blood glucose levels where the sugar in the blood inhibits blood flow to the retinal tissue. The restricted blood flow can weaken and damage the vessels, which may result in a hemorrhage. This hemorrhaging can result in partial or complete vision loss.

People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at risk. However, those that do not have their blood sugar under control or who have had the disease for a long time are at greater risk.

Dr. Mark Fleckner advises the best thing you can do to prevent diabetic retinopathy, as well as other diabetes-related issues, is to keep your blood sugar tightly under control. This means working closely with your doctor and a nutritionist or dietician, eating a diabetes-friendly diet, and taking insulin if prescribed by your doctor.

Initially, Dr. Mark Fleckner says, people with diabetic retinopathy may not realize they have it. They may have blurry vision or difficulty seeing objects far away, but of course, these are not just symptoms of diabetes or diabetic retinopathy but can also be symptoms of other vision difficulties. Diabetic retinopathy becomes more apparent, Dr. Mark Fleckner said, when the person sees dark, floating spots that look web-like or stringy. They may experience patches of complete darkness, and eye fluid may leak from the retina. Conversely, the eye may be unable to drain at all. Leakage or blockage like this is known as diabetic macular edema or neovascular edema, respectively.

Mark R Fleckner MD said it is essential to seek attention from an eye care specialist immediately if you experience any of these symptoms. Not treating the condition can lead to blindness.

It is also important to see your eye doctor regularly to monitor eye health for this and other issues. If your ophthalmologist knows you are diabetic, they can test for retinopathy. The test begins by dilating the pupils and inspecting the eye for signs of leakage or blockage. The doctor may also perform a fluorescein angiography to further inspect the blood vessels in the eye, or use optical coherence tomography to get a different view of the eye and check for swelling.

If your doctor notices signs of retinopathy, they may prescribe medications to reduce swelling and slow vision loss. If the issue has progressed, a vitrectomy may be needed. With this surgery, Mark R Fleckner MD explained, the doctor removes some of the fluid from the leaking vessels or reduces the swelling.

Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark Fleckner Unveils Three Of The Most Common Eye Procedures

Mark Fleckner MD

Dr. Mark Fleckner treats many patients with differing eye conditions. As a board-certified ophthalmologist practicing in New York, there is almost nothing he has not yet treated when it comes to the human eyes.

From diabetic retinopathy to macular degeneration, Dr. Mark Fleckner has seen it all. He specializes in treating diseases affecting the retina. His duties include performing eye surgery and advising patients on treatment options.

Although Dr. Mark Fleckner has handled numerous vision concerns over the years, there are specific eye procedures he has used the most.

“There are plenty of procedures we use at our practice to treat a variety of vision problems. Yet, we find ourselves performing some more than others regularly. Most ophthalmologists would agree they too experience the same at their offices,” says Mark Fleckner, MD.

There are many techniques to address vision problems.

Surgery can correct problems like cataracts. Other procedures can improve poor vision with contacts. It all depends on the severity of the eye problem to identify which remedy to apply.

Dr. Mark Fleckner put together a list of three standard eye procedures. He lays out why you may need them and what to expect when you have them.

1. LASIK
2. PRK
3. Cataract Surgery

1. LASIK

Who needs this procedure?
LASIK eye surgery is a procedure for people who want better vision without having to wear contact lenses or glasses.

What to expect from LASIK Surgery?
The procedure uses a laser to remove tissue under the surface of your cornea. This reshapes the cornea and fixes the way your eye focuses. For both eyes, it is a 30-minutes outpatient surgery and does not require a hospital stay.

You will see an improvement in your vision within a day after surgery. It is also possible you may see clearer right away. You may experience a day or two of eye discomfort.

LASIK can correct nearsightedness, farsightedness, or astigmatism.

2. PRK

Who needs this procedure?
PRK is a surgery that corrects nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism. It allows you to see better without the use of contact lenses or glasses. With PRK, most people’s vision improves by 80% in four weeks and by 95% after 12 weeks.

It is an alternative to LASIK eye surgery. Some individual patients are better suited for PRK than LASIK.

What to expect from PRK surgery?
Your doctor will use a laser to remove cells from the surface of the cornea. It sounds like LASIK surgery, but there are differences. For one, PRK does not involve creating a “flap” in the cornea before reshaping the surface. LASIK eye surgery does require this.

The procedure typically happens in your doctor’s office and takes about 10 minutes to do both eyes. Your eyes may hurt after the surgery, and you might not be able to drive for a few weeks.

3. Cataract Surgery

Who needs this procedure?
Cataracts are common as people age. They develop over the lens of your eye, making it cloudy.

Over time, your vision starts to become blurry and dull.

What to Expect from Cataract Surgery?
This operation is a one-hour outpatient procedure. During the surgery, your eye surgeon replaces your cloudy lens with an artificial one.

Your vision will be blurry at first, but you should see improvements in a couple of days after surgery. Your eyes may feel uncomfortable and itchy while they heal.

Dr. Mark Fleckner highlights the significance of eye exams. Regular eye doctor visits can help with determining if you need a procedure like the most common ones listed above.

To learn more about Dr. Mark Fleckner, visit http://drmarkfleckner.com/.

Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark Fleckner Provides Us Insight Into Our Eyesight: Posterior Vitreous Detachment

Ophthalmologist, Mark Fleckner, strives to educate people about eye diseases, prevention, and treatment.

One such eye disease is posterior vitreous detachment or PVD.

Dr. Mark Fleckner (8)Posterior vitreous detachment is an eye condition. It occurs when the part of the eye (called the vitreous) shrinks and separates from the retina.

A gel-like substance, the vitreous is a transparent liquid in the eyeball. The retina is a light-sensitive area at the back of the eye.

PVD happens at the back of the eye due to changes in the vitreous gel.

It sounds complicated, but Dr. Mark Fleckner breaks PVD down into simpler terms for us.

PVD is a non-sight threatening eye disease. Symptoms can include flashes and floaters in the eye.

The prognosis for PVD symptoms is that they typically subside over time. It can take several weeks to six months for them to disappear.

In some rare cases, patients might still have floaters for up to a year or longer, but this is highly unlikely.

Since PVD does not threaten the vision, it requires no specific treatment.

Dr. Mark Fleckner emphasizes the importance of regular eye exams. He does not want people to make their own diagnosis even if the symptoms sound like that of PVD.

Mark Fleckner states, “Symptoms affecting the eyes should not be ignored. If eye problems arise, it is crucial to visit an Ophthalmologist and to receive proper care.”

New York Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark Fleckner is highly experienced in his field. He is the Doctor to trust with providing the insight needed to protect our eyesight.

To learn more about Dr. Mark Fleckner, visit http://drmarkfleckner.com/.

Ophthalmologist Dr. Mark R. Fleckner MD Answers an Important Eye Question, Does a Retina Tear Always Lead to Detachment?

Mark R. Fleckner, MD, regularly receives questions related to vision and eye care maintenance. A highly-trained Ophthalmologist, Mark R. Fleckner, can produce answers.

Mark R. Fleckner, MD, is a New York board-certified Ophthalmologist who works with patients daily. During his interactions, Dr. Mark Fleckner likes to inform patients on how to take care of their vision. He will share any current eye issues, concerns, and solutions.

Dr. Mark Fleckner (18)

Most recognize the retina as an essential eye function. It is a thin, light-sensitive tissue that generates vision.

At times, tears can form in the retina, creating a risk of retinal detachment and severe loss of vision.

Dr. Mark Fleckner answers the question most have about the retina. People want to know, “Does a retinal tear always lead to detachment?”

Dr. Mark R. Fleckner says the cause of the retinal detachment is due to one or more small tears or holes in the retina. However, it does not always have to cause retinal detachment.

There are some crucial factors to pay attention to when it comes to the eyes.

Retinal tear or detachment is often seen in people who are middle-aged or older. These eye problems are also more likely to occur in people who are very-nearsighted, as well.

It can also develop in those with a family history of retinal problems. Even a severe blow to the eye can cause retinal detachment.

Dr. Mark Fleckner does not want those who have listed pre-conditions to lose hope. There are many ways to help prevent retinal detachment. First, it must be diagnosed by an eye doctor.

There will be symptoms. If there is a tear in the retina, floaters, flashes or sudden blurry vision will occur. With retinal detachment, the symptoms can be the same as retinal tears. There might also be the addition of an area of vision that may seem shadowed.

Mark Fleckner, MD, states that prompt treatment of a torn retina can prevent it from detaching. If not caught early and detachment occurs, eye surgery is necessary to repair it. Otherwise, patients will experience vision loss.

Several treatments are available. Dr. Mark Fleckner explains when there is a tear or hole in the retina, it needs immediate treatment. Eye professionals will recommend a particular type of laser treatment or freezing.

Laser eye treatment is often performed as an outpatient procedure that requires no surgical incision. The eye freezing procedure is similar, but with local anesthesia used to numb the eye.

If the retina does become detached, eye doctors will use surgical procedures to repair it. Mark Fleckner, MD, says that all surgeries press the wall of the eye against retinal tears. It holds both tissues together until scarring seals the tears.

Dr. Mark Fleckner also said that although a retina tear does not always lead to detachment, they can, if not treated. Regular eye visits are essential to avoiding vision loss.

To learn more about Dr. Mark Fleckner, visit http://drmarkfleckner.com/.

Dr. Mark Fleckner Describes How Our Eyes Reveal Much About Our Overall Health

Dr. Mark Fleckner is a highly-trained Ophthalmologist in Garden City, New York. He regularly shares how our eyes provide us with symptoms that suggest the existence of some other health issues.

Dr. Mark Fleckner (8)Dr. Mark Fleckner expresses the importance of eye care and describes how it connects to our overall health.

If you want to know how healthy you are, take a look at your eyes.

During an eye exam, doctors check for clues of vision issues, eye health, and with it, the general health of the rest of the body.

Board-certified ophthalmologist Dr. Mark Fleckner says that there are eye diseases that have no symptoms. As a result, you may have great vision but unhealthy eyes.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends that people have regular eye exams starting at age forty. Eye disease often starts after this age. The results of initial eye screening are how ophthalmologists will determine recommendations and follow-up exams.

Those who have diabetes, other risk factors for eye disease, or additional vision issues should see an ophthalmologist sooner. They may be advised to have eye exams more often.

Dr. Mark Fleckner recognizes that some patients are surprised to learn about possible health problems that go beyond the eyes. There can be signs of health issues such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or a thyroid condition.

The reason these serious body health issues can be found during a routine eye exam is due to the eye being the only place in the body where doctors can noninvasively see blood vessels. Many illnesses like diabetes and hypertension affect the blood vessels, and physicians can spot diseases before patients are aware of it.

“Certain symptoms affecting the eyes should not be ignored,” says Dr. Mark Fleckner. A visit to an eye doctor is in order if you experience any of the following,

1) Yellow eyes. A yellowing of the white part of the eye can be a symptom of hepatitis, a liver disease.

2) Bulging eyes. If eyes suddenly appear to be bulging, it may be a sign of a thyroid problem. Bulging eyes can also be a manifestation of other diseases, such as a tumor behind the eye.

3) Red or bloodshot eyes. Red eyes do not always mean you do not get enough sleep. They can be a sign of an over-active thyroid, allergy, or an eye infection.

4) A sty or other growth on or near the eyelid. Any growth should be checked by a doctor. Particular eyelid or skin cancers can look like a sty or pimple.

5) Dry eyes. This condition often affects people when they get older or experience hormonal changes. But dry eyes can also signal an autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis.

6) Watery or tearing eyes. This can be a sign of corneal disease, a blocked tear duct, or an eyelash or lid problem.

7) Double vision. When double vision occurs, it could be related to thyroid disease, a brain problem, a tumor, or another disease.

8) Seeing halos around lights. Halos may indicate cataracts, glaucoma, corneal disease, or contact lens overuse.

9) Dots and spots. People may see tiny objects that look like small dots, pieces of string, or amoeba-like objects. They can develop with aging. However, if they appear suddenly as hundreds of small black particles, it can be a sign of a retinal tear or detachment.

By keeping your vision healthy, you can keep your body healthy too.

To learn more about Dr. Mark Fleckner, visit http://drmarkfleckner.com/.

Mark R. Fleckner MD

Ophthalmologist Mark R. Fleckner MD Answers An Important Eye Question Does A Retina Tear Always Lead To Detachment

Mark R. Fleckner, MD, regularly receives questions related to vision and eye care maintenance. A highly-trained Ophthalmologist, Mark R. Fleckner, can produce answers.

Mark is a New York board-certified Ophthalmologist who works with patients daily. During his interactions, he likes to inform patients on how to take care of their vision. He will share any current eye issues, concerns, and solutions.

Most recognize the retina as an essential eye function. It is a thin, light-sensitive tissue that generates vision.

At times, tears can form in the retina, creating a risk of retinal detachment and severe loss of vision.

Dr. Mark Fleckner answers the question most have about the retina. People want to know, “Does a retinal tear always lead to detachment?”

Dr. Fleckner says the cause of the retinal detachment is due to one or more small tears or holes in the retina. However, it does not always have to cause retinal detachment.

There are some crucial factors to pay attention to when it comes to the eyes.

Retinal tear or detachment is often seen in people who are middle-aged or older. These eye problems are also more likely to occur in people who are very-nearsighted, as well.

It can also develop in those with a family history of retinal problems. Even a severe blow to the eye can cause retinal detachment.

Dr. Mark Fleckner does not want those who have listed pre-conditions to lose hope. There are many ways to help prevent retinal detachment. First, it must be diagnosed by an eye doctor.

There will be symptoms. If there is a tear in the retina, floaters, flashes or sudden blurry vision will occur. With retinal detachment, the symptoms can be the same as retinal tears. There might also be the addition of an area of vision that may seem shadowed.

Mark Fleckner, MD, states that prompt treatment of a torn retina can prevent it from detaching. If not caught early and detachment occurs, eye surgery is necessary to repair it. Otherwise, patients will experience vision loss.

Several treatments are available. Dr. Mark Fleckner explains when there is a tear or hole in the retina, it needs immediate treatment. Eye professionals will recommend a particular type of laser treatment or freezing.

Laser eye treatment is often performed as an outpatient procedure that requires no surgical incision. The eye freezing procedure is similar, but with local anesthesia used to numb the eye.

If the retina does become detached, eye doctors will use surgical procedures to repair it. Mark Fleckner, MD, says that all surgeries press the wall of the eye against retinal tears. It holds both tissues together until scarring seals the tears.

Dr. Mark Fleckner also said that although a retina tear does not always lead to detachment, they can, if not treated. Regular eye visits are essential to avoiding vision loss.

Mark R. Fleckner MD Talks About The Leading Cause Of Severe Vision Loss In People Over Sixty

Mark R. Fleckner, MD, is a New York board-certified Ophthalmologist. Every day, he examines the eyes of various patients, sharing with them the importance of eye care.

Dr. Mark Fleckner speaks about preventative practices and how to avoid vision loss. He also expresses how not all eyesight loss is preventable and what that means.

Dr. Mark Fleckner (14)

Some decline in vision is the result of aging. At some point, people become aware that the need for glasses will most likely be in their future.

Yet, individuals over the age of sixty can experience more than a slight change in sight. Instead, they can encounter a severe loss in vision, even blindness. Mark R. Fleckner, MD, thinks many do not know enough about its leading cause.

Dr. Mark Fleckner goes further in-depth about it.

Severe vision loss occurs when the small central part of the retina deteriorates. The name of the small part is the macula. The retina is the light-sensing nerve tissue at the back of the eye.

Mark R. Fleckner, MD, reveals the leading cause of severe vision decline for those sixty and older; the name of it is macular degeneration.

At present, there is no straightforward cure for age-related macular degeneration. Nonetheless, Dr. Mark Fleckner states that eye care is still critical at any age.

Treatments are available; some methods may delay the change to the vision of those with macular degeneration.

Mark R. Fleckner, MD, urges everyone to continue visiting their Optometrist or Ophthalmologist. Eye examinations are vital to diagnosis and the state of eye health.

The type of treatment used for macular degeneration depends on the stage of the disease. Proper eye examinations can reveal if it is in the early-stage or more advanced stage.

Most patients with age-related macular degeneration can keep their sight in good health. But, proper, on-going care is necessary.

Individuals, sixty years or older, must not give up on going to eye doctor appointments.

With the help of an eye care professional, slowing the progress of vision degeneration is possible.

Mark R. Fleckner, MD, stresses the importance of eye care examinations. Dr. Mark Fleckner wants everyone of all ages to do what is necessary to keep their eyes healthy.

To learn more about Mark R. Fleckner, MD, visit http://drmarkfleckner.com/.